Joseph’s Christmas story in 100 tweets – #josephstweets

Published 3rd December 2015 by Messy Church

Joseph’s Christmas story but in 100 tweets! This year, Messy Church are tweeting Joseph’s story as if he had had an smartphone back in the day. Only in Matthew’s Gospel do we catch a small glimpse of what the miracle of Christmas meant from Joseph’s perspective. The following idea offers a creative way into Joseph’s story, imagining what he may have tweeted daily about what happened to him in Nazareth and Bethlehem, and later, as he and Mary had to escape to Egypt with their child, Jesus.
Why not follow @MessyChurchBRF on twitter or search the hashtag #josephstweets
Why not get involved too: you could tweet parts of it daily through Advent, to families in your church, as a way to build up to the miracle of Christmas and the days beyond. You could adapt some of the ‘tweets’ for a presentation at a carol service by grouping them as short readings and using different voices to present Joseph’s story. Or you could just read it as inspiration for yourself as you prepare to see Christmas afresh through Joseph’s eyes.
Joseph tweets were originally written by Lucy Moore and Martyn Payne at the request of BRF and used with a limited audience at Christmas in 2011. Matthew 1:18-25 gives us part of Joseph’s story.

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